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See & Share Sightings

Please share your reports of interesting happenings at Hall’s Pond Sanctuary and enjoy reading others’ posts. Click on any photo to enlarge it.

Some ideas of things to share: animals, birds, flowers, trees, a cool rock, a tree shape, a strange fungus; a change you noticed from one visit to the next or over a period of time; snippets of overheard conversation about the Sanctuary; kids’ reactions. Write up something you find curious or awesome. Ask questions about something you saw or heard, or anything that HPS make you wonder about.

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127 Sightings

  • Deborah Stone

    Cutest little baby bunny so frozen in fear that I was able to get right up close to get this photo.

    • Date(s): May 13, 2019
  • Deborah Stone

    Cedar Oil Pastels: I took a friend to HPS the other day and she was horrified by the oil slick “pollution.” I explained the cedar swamp to her, and she said, “WHY don’t you put up signs so people don’t think it’s just disgusting?” (Good question: what happened to the excellent explanatory signs that were there last year?) Because I knew about the treasure of our ancient cedar swamp, I was captivated by the pastel painting on the surface and snapped several photos.

    • Date(s): May 13, 2019
  • Fred Bouchard

    Hall’s Pond & Amory Woods, Norfolk, Massachusetts, US
    May 15, 2019 6:50 AM – 9:00 AM
    Protocol: Traveling 2.5 kilometer(s)
    Comments: Gray to p/c, 45-52F, N breeze. Fred, Ed, Andrew, Mary, Jasper.
    43 species
    Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 0, decamped?
    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 2
    Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) 1 heard, ivy side
    Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 1
    Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 1
    Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) 1
    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 2
    Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 2
    Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens) 2
    Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 1
    Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) 3
    Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus) 1
    Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 3
    Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 1
    White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1
    House Wren (Troglodytes aedon) 1
    Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 1 Fide MB
    Veery (Catharus fuscescens) 1 Fide JW
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 40 conservative: 25 on ball field at 6:50, 15+ in woods on first loop
    Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 2
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 5
    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 1
    American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 6
    Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) 1
    White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) 2
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2
    Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) 8
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 3
    Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) 2
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 7
    Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) 4
    Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) 3
    Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 6
    American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) 2 Fide MB
    Northern Parula (Setophaga americana) 6
    Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) 5
    Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 1
    Chestnut-sided Warbler (Setophaga pensylvanica) 2
    Black-throated Blue Warbler (Setophaga caerulescens) 2 males singing in amory apple trees at eye level
    Black-throated Green Warbler (Setophaga virens) 1
    Wilson’s Warbler (Cardellina pusilla) 2 reported yesterday by JW
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 3
    Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) 2 singing males
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 10
    View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56307027

    • Date(s): 5/15/19
  • Fred Bouchard

    Hall’s Pond & Amory Woods, Norfolk, Massachusetts, US
    May 8, 2019 6:50 AM – 9:10 AM
    Protocol: Traveling 3.2 kilometes (loops)
    Comments: Sunny, light N breeze, 58-62F. Birders & independents: Haynes, Ed, Jasper, Mary B & Mary, Gabor, Paul, Erno.
    42 species
    Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 4 residents and flyovers
    Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 2
    Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica) 3
    Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 1
    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 1
    Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 1
    Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 1 loud rattles early, but not seen
    Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 2
    Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens) 1
    Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 1
    Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) 1 6:55, big maple beyond amory ball field
    Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) 1
    Blue-headed Vireo (Vireo solitarius) 5
    Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) 4
    Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 2
    Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 1
    Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 1
    Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 1
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) 3 above phragmites
    Swainson’s Thrush (Catharus ustulatus) 3
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 22
    Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 2
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 6 ball field
    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 1
    American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 3
    Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) 4 amory maples w/ housies
    White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) 5
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2
    Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) 3
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 4
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 14
    Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) 1
    Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) 1
    Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) 7
    Nashville Warbler (Oreothlypis ruficapilla) 2 fide M&M
    Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 1
    Northern Parula (Setophaga americana) 1
    Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) 1 fide M&M
    Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 1
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 2
    Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) 1
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 25
    View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56012987

    • Date(s): 5/15/19 (sent originally 5/8/18
  • Jasper

    Wilson’s warbler, in the morning rain.

    • Date(s): 5/14/19
  • Neil Gore

    Monday May 6 and Tuesday May 7 were especially good days for nature observation here. For birders, spring favorites have arrived, such as Northern Waterthrush, Warbling Vireo, and Baltimore Orioles. The Orioles have been feeding especially on Crabapple white blossoms, and can sometimes be seen at very close range, even hanging upside down! Belted Kingfisher is being seen fairly regularly; and a less frequent visitor, the Wood Thrush, has been foraging in the uplands area leaf litter.
    As to plants, the spring ephemerals—Bloodroot, Mayapple, Epimedium—are having very good seasons. Bleeding Heart, Trillium, and Trout Lily (Erythronium) may be spotted by the sharp-eyed.
    Also this is an excellent place to seen Virginia Bluebells, which are now just past peak bloom. Get out and see them soon, before they seasonally fade away entirely!
    Also, lots of visitors, and I have been suggesting that they come to Community Day on May 19

    • Date(s): 5/6 and 5/7/19
  • Fred Bouchard

    Hall’s Pond & Amory Woods, Norfolk, Massachusetts, US
    May 8, 2019 6:50 AM – 9:10 AM
    Protocol: Traveling 3.2 kilometer(s)
    Comments: Sunny, light N breeze, 58-62F. Participants and independents: Haynes, Ed, Jasper, Mary & Mary, Gabor, Paul, Erno.
    42 species

    Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 4 residents and flyovers
    Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 2
    Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica) 3
    Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 1
    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 1
    Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) 1
    Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 1 loud rattles early, but not seen
    Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 2
    Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens) 1
    Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 1
    Least Flycatcher (Empidonax minimus) 1 6:55, big maple beyond amory ball field
    Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus) 1
    Blue-headed Vireo (Vireo solitarius) 5
    Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) 4
    Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 2
    Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 1
    Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 1
    Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus) 1
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) 3 above phragmites
    Swainson’s Thrush (Catharus ustulatus) 3
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 22
    Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis) 2
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 6 ball field
    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 1
    American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 3
    Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) 4 amory maples w/ housies
    White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) 5
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2
    Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula) 3
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 4
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 14
    Ovenbird (Seiurus aurocapilla) 1
    Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) 1
    Black-and-white Warbler (Mniotilta varia) 7
    Nashville Warbler (Oreothlypis ruficapilla) 2 fide M&M
    Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) 1
    Northern Parula (Setophaga americana) 1
    Magnolia Warbler (Setophaga magnolia) 1 fide M&M
    Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia) 1
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 2
    Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludovicianus) 1
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 25

    View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S56012987

    • Date(s): 5/8/19
  • Jasper

    Cape May Warbler

    • Date(s): 4/24/19
  • Fred Bouchard

    Hall’s Pond & Amory Woods, Norfolk, Massachusetts, US
    May 1, 2019 6:50 AM – 8:00 AM
    Protocol: Traveling .8 miles
    Comments: Migration still stalled; gray, wet, calm, 48F; Ed & JW; quit early with drizzle. Kingfisher appeared to spook heron circa 7am, and both flew off. 20 species.
    Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 2
    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 0
    Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 1
    Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 1
    Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) 1
    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 1
    Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 1
    Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens) 3
    Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 2
    Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 4
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) 3
    Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) 1
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 16
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 2
    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 1
    American Goldfinch (Spinus tristis) 2
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 1
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 2
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 15
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 1
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 5
    View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55630348

    • Date(s): 5/1/19
  • Deborah Stone

    The white Trillium are in bloom.

    • Date(s): April 29, 2019
  • Fred Bouchard

    Hall’s Pond & Amory Woods, Norfolk, Massachusetts, US
    Apr 24, 2019 6:55 AM – 8:55 AM
    Protocol: Traveling 2.5 kilometer(s)
    Comments: Gray, 52F, stalled migration, 25 species, Amory path and boardwalk flooded.

    Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 2
    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 2
    Wild Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) 1
    Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon)) 2
    Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 3
    Herring Gull (Larus argentatus) 1
    Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) 1
    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 1
    Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 1
    Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens) 3
    Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 3
    Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 7
    Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 1
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) 2
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 23
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 4
    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 1
    Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) 1
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 2
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 2
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 16
    Northern Waterthrush (Parkesia noveboracensis) 1
    Yellow-rumped Warbler (Setophaga coronata) 2
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 2
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 4.

    • Date(s): 4/24/19
  • Fred Bouchard

    Hall’s Pond & Amory Woods, Norfolk, Massachusetts, US
    Apr 17, 2019 7:05 AM – 9:20 AM
    Traveling 3.0 kilometers.
    Comments: Sunny, 45F, stiff (10kts) N breeze. Fred, Ed, Jasper, cameo by Scott and Ellen.
    Herps: 2 large (12″) Red-Eared Sliders sunning by mama goose. Mammals: 2 cottontails. 28 species.

    Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 2 breeding pair
    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 3 pair on amory swale
    Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) 2
    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 1 sunning all AM 12′ atop willow stump @ cement forebay: unusual!
    Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperii) 2 flew out of woods together and over ball field
    Yellow-bellied Sapsucker (Sphyrapicus varius) 1 last bird: smallish female low in oaks behind parking lot
    Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 1 chirruping constantly; pair>; new nest in large willow
    Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens) 2
    Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 1
    Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) 1
    Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 4
    Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) 1 few passes over pond
    Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 2
    Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor) 1
    White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1
    Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) 1 high in budding ivy street maple
    Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) 1 in garden yews and saplings
    Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) 3 amory st. oak litter; upland chain-link fence; by gazebo
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 26 few on field today
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 2
    House Finch (Haemorhous mexicanus) 2
    Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) 2
    White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia albicollis) 2 1 singing in garden
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 5 2 singers
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 2 males over; 1 calling
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 30 dozen in one view; it’s a grackle-ocracy!
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 2 males
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 12 4 x garden, crossing, Amory St.

    View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S55053198

    • Date(s): 4/17/19
  • Deborah Stone

    The Canada Geese are starting a new family. Saw a Great Blue Heron, a Cormorant and a Mallard in the pond, many turtles sunning, and a pair of Ruby-Crowned Kinglets flitting in the bushes.

    • Date(s): April 14, 2019
  • Fred Bouchard

    Apr 10, 2019 6:45 AM – 8:15 AM
    Protocol: Traveling 2.0 kilometer(s)
    Comments: Drizzly, clearing, 40F, North breeze 10mph. Dog walkers galore. 3 cottontails. 23 bird species. Two birders. Missed yesterday’s Palm Warbler, Kinglets, Creeper.

    Canada Goose (Branta canadensis) 2
    Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) 3 squabbling males chastized by goose
    Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Feral Pigeon)) 1
    Ring-billed Gull (Larus delawarensis) 3
    Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) 1 flyover
    Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) 1 flyover
    Belted Kingfisher (Megaceryle alcyon) 1 flitted early pondside, gone by 7:20
    Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus) 1
    Downy Woodpecker (Dryobates pubescens) 2
    Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) 2
    Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe) 1
    Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) 3
    Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus) 2
    White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis) 1
    American Robin (Turdus migratorius) 42 25 on field, rest scattered
    European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris) 9
    Fox Sparrow (Passerella iliaca) 2 in pine scrub, ivy st. fence
    Dark-eyed Junco (Junco hyemalis) 2
    Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia) 4 brightly colored group on grass by willows, defying dog-walkers
    Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus) 1 male singing, off-camera
    Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula) 12
    Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) 1
    House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) 5

    View this checklist online at https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S54780876

    • Date(s): 4/10/19
  • Deborah Stone

    The beautiful bark on this River Birch caught my eye because it is so much shaggier and more dramatic than White Paper Birches. The undersides of the peeled pieces are pinkish beige. According to Ellen Forester, the HPS plant guru, River Birch bark tends to smooth out as the trees age so this is a fairly young tree. Even the thicker bark on the main trunk displays a rich pattern of colors and shapes. Check it out–there are at least three of these trees on the edge of the pond behind the north overlook.

    • Date(s): March 30, 2019
  • Deborah Stone

    I counted 14 turtles sunning themselves at noontime. Thirteen were on logs in the northeast corner. This one found itself a secluded spot on a dead stump near the Beacon St. entrance. It took no notice of the BU students (see next Sighting), perfectly illustrating their theme of serenity.

    • Date(s): March 30, 2019